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Missional

Our mission statement claims that we are “missional.” We usually like to define things in the positive; however, for this blog we will attempt to define the term “missional” by what it is not with help from wwwfriendsofmissional.org. Enjoy.

The missional church is not a dispenser of religious goods and services or a place where people come for their weekly spiritual fix.

The missional church is not a place where mature Christians come to be fed and have their needs met.

The missional church is not a place where “professionals” are hired to do all the work of the church.

The missional church is not a place where the “professionals” teach the children and youth about God to the exclusion of parental responsibility.

The missional church is not a church with a “good missions program.” The people are the missions program and includes going to “Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

The missional church is not missional just because it is contemporary, young, hip, postmodern-sensitive, seeker-sensitive or even traditional.

The missional church is not about big programs and organizations to accomplish God’s missionary purpose. This does not imply no program or organization, but that they will not drive mission. They will be used in support of people on mission.

The missional church is not involved in political party activism, either on the right or left. As Brian McLaren wrote, we need “purple peoplehood” — people who don’t want to be defined as red or blue, but have elements of both.

Not simply how many people come to our church services, but how many people our church serves.

Not simply how many people attend our ministry, but how many people have we equipped for ministry.

Not simply how many people minister inside the church, but how many minister outside the church.

Not simply helping people become more whole themselves, but helping people bring more wholeness to their world. (i.e. justice, healing, relief)

Not simply how many ministries we start, but how many ministries we help.

Not simply how many unbelievers we bring into the community of faith, but how many ‘believers’ we help experience healthy community.

Not simply working through our past hurts, but working alongside the Spirit toward wholeness.

Not simply counting the resources that God gives us to steward, but counting how many good stewards are we developing for the sake of the world.

Not simply how we are connecting with our culture but how we are engaging our culture.

Not simply how much peace we bring to individuals, but how much peace we bring to our world.

Not simply how effective we are with our mission, but how faithful we are to our God.

Not simply how unified our local church is, but how unified is “the church” in our neighborhood, city and world?

Not simply how much we immerse ourselves in the text, but how faithfully we live in the story of God.

Not simply being concerned about how our country is doing, but being concern for the welfare of other countries.

Not simply how many people we bring into the kingdom, but how much of the kingdom we bring to the earth.

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